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there is no carving out right now. it is under assault, and we just made permanent when the bush era tax cuts for 99% of the households in the country. that was a so-called victory. what we are doing is tricking the base to spend on any of these programs. we do not have money because the taxes disappear. you look at where the corporate sector keeps its money. the cayman islands. we have constructed this. this is not paralysis. this is a bipartisan approach. both parties have been on this. the republicans do it gleefully. the democrats do it wringing their hands. they have both sided with cutting the taxes on the top. they are parties to the disappearance of the civilian programs of our national government, which work, and if you looked at the budget president obama has put on the table, on a non-security discretionary budget under this president is to decline from about 4% of national income in 2010 down to below 2% by the end of this decade. 1.7% of national income for jobs, training, education, for all the infrastructure, the environment, climate, technology, and forgetting who government? this is
taxes and boosting your retirement security. here's finra's gerri walsh. >> with washington roiling from one crisis to another, many americans feel uncertain about the impact of changing tax rates and how to achieve retirement security in a fragile economy. but, especially at times like this, workers should focus on what they can control. no matter your tax rate, contributing to a 401(k) can help you save money on taxes and boost your retirement security. your contributions to a traditional plan are not included in your taxable income, and earnings on roth contributions are tax-free. the good news for savers is that in 2013 401(k) limits go up to $17,500, and employees aged 50 or over can contribute an additional $5,500. but, at the end of 2011, the average account balance in 401(k)s nationwide was just under $60,000. if you're not sure you're doing all you can to lower your taxable wages and secure your retirement, finras new 401(k) save the max calculator can help you do the math to find out. i'm gerri walsh. >> tom: join us tomorrow on twitter for a tweet-up, that's when you meet toge
nonsense because it involves raising taxes. i think you have to do bovment i think you have to have more revenue and you have to cut back spending. >> susie: let's say congress doesn't do that. what happens next? explain to people what happens next. >> i think the real risk is that we come to a showdown in march when the current stopgap budget ends and we face the government shutdown. people will lose services. people will lose jobs. and there will be a fiscal contraction, on top of the ones that we've already put in place. and that's not great for the economy, for sure. >> you know, and this whole conversation about a budget and the deficit and all of that. it's all about raising taxes and cutting spending. and there's no discuss about growth. and that is what americans really want. growth and jobs. what do we have to do to get growth? >> well, the badh6+suz there, susie s that while higher growth is by far the best remedy, it's very hard to put if into effect. in a sizable way. you need more investment in human beings, that's education and so on. you need more investment in physical pl
lap. proposition 30 passed. temporary taxes passed. the budget looks a lot better. i think this was the governor's chance to pivot, to pivot to talking about what makes california great, how we get them back on track. don't worry, we're getting there. so i took this as a real optimistic speech with a lot of details, a lot of brown history facts. and really a message i think not only to the legislature but to the public of, like, i'm watching it. we're going to be careful, but we're going to move forward. >> and, john, you mentioned he was very quirky in his speech. clearly the governor is enjoying his popularity right now and quoted everyone from philosophers and poets. let's take a listen. >> i'm sorry, say again? >> the most diverse, creative and longest standing mass migration in the history of the world. that's california, and we are sons and daughters. this special destiny never ends. it slows. it falters. it goes off the track. and ignorance and prejudice but soon resumes again. more vibrant and more stunning in its boldness. >> so, john, how has the speech been recei
. earnings were down considerably from last year thanks to a tax settlement a year ago. but the results were well above wall street estimates, thanks to a double digit jump in revenues. driving that growth was an increase in deliveries of commercial planes. the 737 remains the driver, with 105 planes delivered. the 777 also helped, as did the 23 dreamliners handed to customers last quarter, but those planes can't fly right now. u.s. and japanese regulators have grounded the 787 due to concerns about its lithium batteries overheating and catching fire. today boeing management said it is making good progress in finding the cause. peter arment is the aerospace analyst at investment firm sterne agee. >> tom: boeing still plans to ramp up production of that dreamliner, triple the number it delivers and takes payment for. how confident are you it can stick with that? >> we're very confident. i mean, yes, there is no question there is headline risk with the 787. i think that there is concerns about what the ultimate solution will be, or root cause. but everything we have seen, it is a battery defec
it does make tough decisions on taxes, on spending, on energy policy, that america has some credibility that we got it more right than wrong. >> tell me about the lobbyists. who are these people? >> well, the problem with lobbyists, a lot of them come off the hill, a lot of them come out of congress. many members of congress leave the capital and go to k street. and it's a real reflection of how money has overtaken politics. and the real problem with that system is not the individual lobbyists. a lot of times they'll have legitimate points to present to members of congress. the problem is the amount of money that lobbyists represent. and what tends to happen in congress is that the concerns of those lobbyists, the concerns of amgen, become much more of the topic of discussion, debate, and resolution than the concerns of middle america, the concerns of the farmers. you know, in congress, we didn't even vote in the house on a farm bill. this is the first time in the history of this country where a house agriculture committee, on which i sat, but in a bipartisan vote, we worked together, p
is heading out of town. and interestingly, based on some spending cuts and tax increases that have been implemented so far, we're pretty close. and jack lew intimately knows what it takes to get from here to there. now, i think you, also, to, about other issues of the treasury's beat, international currency, financial markets, implementing the dodd-frank issue. as i mentioned, financial reform is still incomplete. so jack lew is going to have to oversee those as well. >> susie: let me get back to the budget issue. jack lew was also the architect of this sequester mechanism. a lot of people are worried if that kicks in, the automatic spending cuts, that, you know, that would really be a bad thing for the economy. some democrats are surprisingly saying maybe that's a good way to handle this whole budget cuts. where do you think jack lew stands on that? and, unfortunately, we just have half a minute left. what do you think? >> well, i think jack recognizes that if the sequester kicks in, it does two things. one, it makes deficit savings a lot more pronounced. that's $85 billion in one year
americans are worried about higher payroll taxes and the outlook for jobs. but despite that, the dow rose 72 points, the nasdaq fell a fraction, the s&p added seven points. after the market close, investors also shrugged off a disappointing earnings report from amazon and bought up the stock. amazon shares surged as much as 9%. it earned 21 cents a share, six cents below analyst estimates. revenues rose 22% but were a billion less than estimates. amazon's c.e.o., jeff bezos, said the company's e-book business is paying off, growing by about 70% last year and is now a "multibillion-dollar category." but he didn't say how many kindle fire tablets amazon has sold. still, jason moser, an analyst with the motley fool, says: >> really, i think that amazon is going to prove to be the leader here in retail-- not just online retail-- because i think retail in general is heading towards online retail for the most part, and amazon is really what is really setting the standard there. and that's why i think you see amazon performing so well today, and companies like walmart and target and best buy really
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)